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Lawyer video (safe for work, especially if you're at Jenkens & Gilchrist)

There is nothing -- nothing -- I love so much as an old-fashioned, highly embarrassing, amateur home video. 

It's even better when the home-movie-maker adds special effects like slo-mo and unnecessary zooming. The best ones depict classic private moments -- shampooing, potty-training, moving -- to a swelling score of flamboyant movie-music.

Picture me folding laundry or typing at 4 a.m. to Beethoven's Fifth Symphony with a towel-turban on my wet hair. See what I mean? You're laughing at me, not with me. But it's funny.

This preamble is my attempt to explain why I was predisposed to giggle at a promotional video by the Texas law firm Jenkens & Gilchrist that Christine Hurt blogged on The Conglomerate  in August.  In this campy office-home-movie, a bunch of suit-wearing, mostly white, mostly male, mostly sweaty guys charge the office in a client-service lather, yelling excitedly, litigation cases a mano, while their carefully manicured secretaries (yes, all women) cheer them on.

I had never seen this video until today, when John Bringardner of The American Lawyer magazine posted this story about it on Law.com (the network where my blog, Legal Blog Watch, appears).  Bringardner's story makes clear, as does my own visit to The Conglomerate blog, that many of their readers aren't laughing, period. While some readers say they don't see any harm in this little flick, many readers wrote in to say they are horrified.

As for me, well, I confess that this sensation of can't-stop-looking-cringeworthy-delight is not typically one with which I associate my place of work. I can't take the movie seriously, but it's also hard to imagine that if my livelihood or life was on the line, I would seek representation by one of these guys (there might be a woman in that mosh pit, but I have to take Bringardner's word for it).

Then again, I haven't met any of these people personally. In an office, I mean, as opposed to a sports bar.

Hurt makes a convincing argument that J&G's video was a recruiting tool. Would you want to work there? You tell me:  Read the blog; see the video.

Update: Um, I guess it could have been worse.  Hat-tip: Althouse.

Posted by Laurel Newby on October 26, 2005 at 04:01 PM | Permalink | TrackBack (4)

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Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Lawyer video (safe for work, especially if you're at Jenkens & Gilchrist):

» Sexist Law Firm or Just Plain Fun? from Objective Justice
Maybe it could be construed to be sexist, so I took a completely unscientific poll of the women law students here at Lewis & Clark. What did I find? Not only did none of them see the video as sexist, ( a few called it "kinda weird"), but many more of t... [Read More]

Tracked on Oct 26, 2005 8:02:45 PM

» Sexist Law Firm or Just Plain Fun? from Objective Justice
Maybe it could be construed to be sexist, so I took a completely unscientific poll of the women law students here at Lewis & Clark. What did I find? Not only did none of them see the video as sexist, ( a few called it "kinda weird"), but many more of t... [Read More]

Tracked on Oct 26, 2005 8:04:54 PM

» GO JOHN GO! from The Common Scold
John Bringardner, Law Technology News' news editor, is getting some great traction from an article he wrote for our sister publication, The American Lawyer, about a recruiting video created by Jenkins Gilchrest. The wonderful Lisa Stone, doyenne of In... [Read More]

Tracked on Oct 26, 2005 9:36:50 PM

» GO JOHN GO! from The Common Scold
John Bringardner, Law Technology News' news editor, is getting some great traction from an article he wrote for our sister publication, The American Lawyer, about a video created by Jenkins Gilchrest. The wonderful Lisa Stone, doyenne of Inside Opinio... [Read More]

Tracked on Oct 26, 2005 9:39:54 PM

 
 
 
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