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You can lead a lawyer to a high-tech solution, but you cannot make him type

So. If powerful, specialized software is going to save the legal world from Post-it notes and managing partners who won't read e-mail, how quickly should law firms be expected to embrace the solution? Real quick? Sorta quick? Under duress? Ron Friedmann, a former legal CIO who has launched a portal before, asks, "Can anyone share data on lawyer usage after rolling out software available to all lawyers? OK, maybe you don't have data. What percentage use do you think reflects a good result after two years?" He writes:

"I'm not sure if anyone has good comparative data; consider some examples:
- Mandatory systems (e.g., document management) say little because lawyers have no choice.
- Highly specialized practice applications say little because usage is inherently limited.
- Anecdotes suggest that CRM uptake is low, though the intent was for widespread usage.
- I suspect Lexis and Westlaw took over a decade or two to achieve current usage rates."

What do you think? Tell me or tell Friedmann here. Thanks.

Posted by Laurel Newby on December 19, 2005 at 02:17 PM | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack (0)

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