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Supreme Inequality Among Clerks

While we're on the topic of gender inequality, Tony Mauro tells us today what we already suspected: High Court Clerks: Still White, Still Male. He writes:

"[A]s high court clerkships drift ever upward into the stratosphere of earthly rewards to which young lawyers can aspire, one stark reality persists: Recipients of this prize are overwhelmingly white, and mostly male.

"Eight years after attention was first called to the dearth of minorities among high court clerks, it appears that only three of the 37 clerks serving at the Court this term are nonwhite. No Hispanics or Native Americans seem to be among the ranks of law clerks, and not a single African-American male."

In the chambers of seven of the nine justices, Mauro reports, all the clerks are white -- only Clarence Thomas and Stephen Breyer hired minorities this term. Even worse, the number of minority clerks is the lowest in recent years. Todd C. Peppers, author of a new book, "Courtiers of the Marble Palace," tells Mauro that the dearth of minorities "opens a real issue of social justice." 

Posted by Robert J. Ambrogi on May 25, 2006 at 03:05 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)

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