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Blogs Grading Law Schools

Used to be that U.S. News and World Report, albeit controversial, had cornered the market on ranking law schools. That's no longer so, according to this article from The Wall Street Journal, Law Schools Also Ranked By Blogs. According to the article:

In the last two years, at least a dozen upstart Web sites, academic papers and blogs have stepped in with surveys of their own to feed the hunger for information on everything from the quality of the faculty to what a school's diploma might be worth to future employers.  Last year, a blogger and Notre Dame Law School graduate who goes by the name "law firm addict" began trolling message boards frequented by law students. The blogger invited students to share figures on school representation in law firms' summer-associate programs (one finding: Columbia is the perennial winner in New York), as well as where federal appeals clerks went to school. (This year's winner is Stanford by number of clerks as a percentage of its class.) The information is posted on lawfirmaddict.blogspot.com and lawclerkaddict.blogspot.com.

Not surprisingly, the blogs provide more useful information than U.S. News, which focuses on factors more important to academia than to students making an investment in their future -- and who are interested most in clerkship and job placement. From the article:

Knowing the value of a school's diploma to firms that pay big first-year salaries has grown more important as law school has become a bigger investment. Between 1987 and 2005, the average public law school's resident tuition increased to $13,145 from $2,398, while the average private-school tuition jumped to $28,900 from $8,911, according to the American Bar Association. Graduates in 2006 of public and private law schools had borrowed an average of $54,500 and $83,000, respectively, according to the ABA.

Now that law schools are being graded, will blogs start ranking law professors as well?

Posted by Carolyn Elefant on June 28, 2007 at 03:35 PM | Permalink | Comments (4)

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