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DivorceDeli.com Lets Users Order McDivorce

So, let's say you want to end the constant beefs with your wife or dump a spouse who's always sneaking a little extra on the side. Now, there's a place to find the help (or helpings) that you need: DivorceDeli.com, a low-cost online divorce law firm that serves up a variety of a la carte options to couples who want to untie the knot. [Source: Market Watch]. 

Designed as a fixed-price menu, DivorceDeli.com lists selections such as a basic divorce without children for $249 or with children for $299. Prices for listed services apply in "most cases," though the firm will also cook up other family law services, which are priced "on request." 

So who's the master chef behind DivorceDeli.com? That would be Florida divorce attorney Steven D. Miller, who pioneered the predecessor to DivorceDeli.com, an online divorce site called DivorceEZ.com.  Following a bar complaint about the DivorceEZ site, Miller changed the trade name to DivorceDeli.com "so that consumers realize that [the site] doesn't make online divorce easy," said Miller. Of course, if Miller really wants to upgrade his establishment so that it matches the congenial, down-home look of his new site, he might consider removing the online YouTube video where Miller promises to help clients "get out of the hellhole [they] call a marriage" and rid themselves of the "vermin that [they] call a spouse."

Don't get me wrong with what I'm about to write, because I applaud Miller and other online, virtual legal service pioneers for making divorce faster, cheaper and more accessible to the thousands of clients who otherwise could not afford the services of a lawyer. At the same time, I'm troubled by using a fast-food menu as a model for law firm service. While clients don't necessarily deserve or need white-glove wait service when it comes to divorce, treating the process of dissolving something as sacred as a marriage as casually as going through the McDonald's drive-through doesn't strike me as such a good idea either. Or is dignity something that costs extra?

Posted by Carolyn Elefant on July 11, 2008 at 04:11 PM | Permalink | Comments (3)

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