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What Is the Million Dollar Advocates Forum?

Have you ever heard of, or been invited to join the Million Dollar Advocates Forum and wondered exactly what it is? So did Eric Turkewitz, who addresses that million dollar question at his New York Personal Injury Law Blog. Here's what he learned.

According to Turkewitz, the Million Dollar Advocates Forum is a "prestigious" group that is "limited" to those who have "won" million dollar settlements or verdicts. It's also a rather exclusive group, at least according to the promotional hype on the Web site, which claims that the forum has 3,000 members -- fewer than one percent of all U.S. lawyers.

Turkewitz poses some hard questions about the value of membership in the group, which incidentally costs $1,200. First, he notes that if a lawyer has already won a few million-dollar verdicts, he can list them on his own Web site. Why pay $1,200 for this "faux honor?"

Second, the forum isn't as exclusive as the organizers would like it to seem. The 3,000 members aren't the only lawyers who have handled million-dollar cases. Instead, it represents the number of lawyers who have handled million-dollar cases and paid $1,200 for the privilege of forum membership.

Turkewitz concludes by noting that, in part, his post stems from a feeling of sour grapes. It's not that Turkewitz isn't eligible to join the forum -- his law firm Web site confirms that he is. Instead, Turkewitz writes that he's envious because:

I didn't think of this first. Who needs to work when you can get, according the web site, over 3,000 people to pony up that kind of cash for a piece of paper? Who knew there were thousands of lawyers out there so willing to part with their cash for this token?

As for you, how would you prefer to earn your millions? Through million-dollar cases, or million-dollar schemes?

Posted by Carolyn Elefant on May 19, 2009 at 04:43 PM | Permalink | Comments (6)

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