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Trend Watch: 'Bring Your Own Damn Toilet Paper'

Tproll My perch here at Legal Blog Watch following hundreds of legal blogs and developments sometimes allows me to detect important trends early. This week, LBW's Trend Watch is on red alert following two similar reports of government entities tying to save money in a disturbing way: by not buying toilet paper.

When I saw the first "no more TP" story, I thought it had to be an outlier. The Houston Chronicle reported (via Consumerist) on Wednesday that Texas A&M's Department of Student Affairs is planning to save $82,000 by eliminating free toilet paper in the residence halls. Under the proposal now being discussed, students will get "a few free rolls at the beginning of a semester," after which they will be on their own.

Michael Spiegelhauer, a 20-year-old student at the school, said "it's going to become a problem." His buddy, Daniel Overstreet, asked "How's [Spiegelhauer] going to get TP? He doesn't even have a car." Overstreet predicted that TP theft was inevitable. "It's going to make people resort to going where there is toilet paper on campus and taking it from there."

As I was still contemplating the midnight TP raids that appear imminent at Texas A&M, I read in New York's Daily News that Newark, N.J., Mayor Cory Booker vowed yesterday to stop spending city funds on toilet paper as part of the city's effort to close a $70 million budget gap. "We're going to stop buying everything from toilet paper to printer paper," Booker said.

Rahaman Muhammad, president of the Service Employees International Union Local 617, was not pleased with the TP threat. "He wants to balance the budget on workers' backsides," he said. "Maybe Booker is gonna make people carry those little packets of tissue."

Deans, mayors -- please! Buy your people some freakin' toilet paper and cut back elsewhere! Don't you see where this is leading? Do I really need to post the video below?

  Spareasquare

Posted by Bruce Carton on July 23, 2010 at 12:14 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)

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