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Blawger/Candidate Suggests Giving Your Law License to God, but Not Your Vote?

Bloom It may not have the mainstream appeal of the story about the Georgetown Law graduate who sold his law degree on craigslist, but blogger, and Republican candidate for the Pennsylvania legislature, Stephen Bloom of the Believer's Guide to Legal Issues, has built a following around the notion of giving your law license to God.

Bloom wrote a book that shares the same name as his blog and has a second blog along the same lines. His basic philosophy, he says, is captured by this article in the Liberty Legal Journal, adapted from a presentation he often gives to students.

It's pretty heavy stuff. For example:

(2)    Do not assume that having faith is enough. Be alert and ready to resist when Satan presents you with a shadow mission for your career that hits all your weakest places, and plays perfectly to your ego and talents.

Warning lawyers to resist Satan -- isn't that like warning fish to stay dry?

Bad jokes aside, reading Bloom's writings, and some of the writings about him (including prior LBW coverage), evokes interesting questions. For starters: How should religious belief intersect with secular law? Would/should Bloom ever represent a client that does not share his faith?

And how does Bloom's philosophy affect his aspiring political career? The following is one of his tenets:

(4)    Do not be afraid to reveal your faith in the marketplace. Be a transparent, hopeful, honest, joyful witness in your work. Do not hide who you are, do not hide Jesus Christ.

Yet his religious beliefs seem to be downplayed on his campaign website, with no real mention of his blogs (though there is a link to the Amazon page for his book), and no explicit Christian message as part of his platform.

Readers: the floor is open. Have anything to say about Bloom specifically or religion in law or politics generally?

Posted by Eric Lipman on August 24, 2010 at 01:17 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)

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