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Porn Industry May Play the 'Shame Card" in Litigation to Stop Piracy

With it's YouTube public service campaign against piracy apparently not getting the job done, the porn industry has apparently moved on to Plan B: the shame card.

Law & Disorder reports that last week in Tucson, a large number of porn studio reps and lawyers gathered for a "content protection retreat." The goal of the CPR was to get the industry working together on an anti-piracy strategy that will work by January 2012. The retreat was top secret, but L&D reports that lawyers presently "engaged in widespread 'Doe' litigation against anonymous file-swappers were present to make their case."

L&D reports that the porn industry is highly dependent on individual sales to home users, and is therefore more at risk from the various porn "tube" sites that now appear on the Internet. These sites are "modeled after YouTube," L&D says, and are "awash in copyrighted content." One unique litigation advantage the porn industry may possess against pirates is the weapon of shame. As one industry executive stated last month, "It seems like it will be quite embarrassing for whichever user ends up in a lawsuit about using a popular shemale title. When it comes to private sexual fantasies and fetishes, going public is probably not worth the risk that these torrent and peer-to-peer users are taking."

Posted by Bruce Carton on October 28, 2010 at 01:38 PM | Permalink | Comments (2)

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