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What Happens in Canada, Stays in Canada

If you are not into the whole "monogamy" thing, Canada may soon be the place for you. If two cases now going through the court system go the right way wrong way the same way, Canada may soon be a place where both prostitution and polygamy are legal.

As I discussed here, in late September a Toronto judge struck down the country's prostitution laws altogether, finding that the laws were endangering sex workers’ lives. (You may recall the memorable words of Terri-Jean Bedford, the woman who challenged the prostitution law, when asked how she was going to celebrate the victory: "I’m going to spank some ass,” she said, while cracking a riding whip).

The Precedent blog reported yesterday that an appeal of the Toronto judge's opinion was heard yesterday by the Ontario Court of Appeal, and that lawyers for government warned of "dire consequences" if the ruling striking down several prostitution laws in the province comes into effect (scheduled to occur next week).

But why stop at prostitution? In Vancouver, Canadian laws against polygamy are also being challenged in a court case now underway. The Globe and Mail reports that a lawyer for the Crown stated before a packed courtroom yesterday that those challenging the law "urge the court to make Canada the sole Western nation to decriminalize polygamy. The reasonably apprehended result would be an influx of polygamous families who are presently barred from the country in addition to the practice’s domestic growth.” Polygany is reportedly spreading in Canada's Muslim community due to uncertainty as to the criminal provisions against the practice.

The Globe and Mail reports that

The case will consider whether the law against polygamy is consistent with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and also look at what are the necessary elements of an offence – that is, whether Section 293 requires that polygamy involve a minor or some other element of abuse or exploitation.

Oh, Canada!

Posted by Bruce Carton on November 23, 2010 at 11:47 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

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