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Arnie Who? L.A. What? Arnie Becker Fades From View (Except in New York)

LALawPerhaps 2011 will be remembered as the year that Arnie Becker officially faded from view as a relevant legal character. Becker, who at one time was probably the best-known lawyer on TV (he was played by actor Corbin Bernsen on the show "L.A. Law" from 1986 to 1994), has had a tough time this year.

First, despite being optimistically slotted as a #3 seed in Above the Law's Fictional Lawyer Madness -- a contest in which ATL readers voted to determine their favorite movie and TV lawyers from the past 30 years -- Becker was bounced from the contest in the second round. After defeating his weak Round 1 opponent (Romo Lampkin, a character from "Battlestar Galactica"), the once-mighty Becker was unceremoniously knocked out of the tournament in the Sweet Sixteen round by Alan Shore of "Boston Legal."

Adding to Becker's 2011 woes, Hollywood, Esq. reports that actor Bernsen has now filed a lawsuit against Innovative Legal Marketing, a Virginia-based company that provides marketing services for lawyers and law firms, because ILM has allegedly tried to pull out of an agreement to have Bernsen/Becker promote the company. Bernsen alleges that in 2009, he and ILM entered into a five-year agreement under which Bernsen would "record promotional announcements, make promotional appearances, be available for still photography sessions" and generally help ILM sell law firms on the idea of hiring marketing assistance.

ILM allegedly agreed to pay Bernsen $1 million: a $50,000 fee at the beginning of each year and eleven equal monthly payments of $13,636.36 each year of the agreement. In June 2011, however, ILM informed Bernsen that it was terminating the agreement because, alas, "the campaign was not successful -- except in New York where the name of Arnie Becker still holds some luster and the commercials would still run." Hollywood, Esq. reports that Bernsen claims ILM has breached the agreement and is now "unjustly enriching itself."

Posted by Bruce Carton on October 11, 2011 at 04:22 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)

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