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U.K. Undercover Police Get Green Light to Have Sex With Suspects While on the Job

Back in my fraternity days, we were quite confident that we were protected from any "narcs" coming into our parties to look for underage drinking because, according to decades of fraternity gospel, if you ask a person if they are a cop, they are required to answer truthfully. Unfortunately, as many prostitutes have no doubt learned the hard way ("are you a cop, honey?"), this gospel is not actually true

In January 2012, a massive credit card cloning scam/gang was busted, and it came out that the ringleader of the gang used his own twisted version of this cop-finding tactic to try to weed out any feds that might be trying to infiltrate his gang. The Athens Banner-Herald reported at the time that 

Anyone who wanted to join Yadav’s ring had to prove himself by having group sex with Yadav -- sometimes with other men, women or both -- all while Yadav videotaped the scene.

Though the sex satisfied Yadav’s own perversions, he used the unusual initiations to weed out people he thought might belong to law enforcement, according to Athens-Clarke police Detective Beverly Russell, who helped break the cloning ring.

“Basically, everyone that became involved (in the ring) met Vikas in S&M chat sites, and (the way) for them to get into the inner sanctum of the group was to have sex with him and others, and be videoed doing it,” Russell said.

“That was to protect himself, to keep cops from infiltrating his group,” she said.

In that case, the ringleader was making the fairly reasonable bet that no federal agent was going to engage in a videotaped ménage à trois in order to carry out his duties. Well, that may work in the U.S., but not in the U.K.!

On Wednesday, Home Office Minister and Sussex MP Nick Herbert gave undercover police officers in the U.K. the green light to "have sexual relationships with suspected criminals if it means they are more plausible," ITV News reports. This decision came after a case police were pursuing against certain environmental activists fell apart "after it emerged the group was infiltrated by an officer called Mark Kennedy, who had been in sexual relationships with two women in the campaign."

Presumably to the deep chagrin of the spouses of undercover officers throughout the U.K., Herbert decided that it was important that police be permitted to have sex with activists "because otherwise it could be used as a way of outing potential undercover officers."

Posted by Bruce Carton on June 14, 2012 at 04:22 PM | Permalink | Comments (3)

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