Law.com Blog Network

About The Bloggers

Blogroll

Things That Exist, Vol. 7: Secondhand Lawyer Suits and Ties

I feel like I'm on my computer constantly, poring through hundreds of feeds and stories daily, spanning the globe to bring you the constant variety of legal blogs and information you deserve. But I definitely miss a lot of things that everyone else seems to know about -- the type of things where I can only scratch my head and say, "Really?!? They have that? Never heard of it." 

Today's thing I never knew existed: Secondhand lawyer suits and ties

On the Lawyerist blog today, Leo Mulvihill Jr., writes that after meeting a fellow lawyer who confessed to only having three suits in his wardrobe, Mulvihill informed this lawyer that Mulvihill had "14 in my wardrobe right now. But that's just my summer rotation. I've been too busy here at the office to switch out to fall rotation." The other lawyer was stunned to hear about this abundance of suits, and Mulvihill filled him in on his secret for acquiring such a wardrobe without a "trust fund or offshore accounts": the secondhand suit market.

According to Mulvihill, everything from Brooks Brothers to Boss can be picked up secondhand for pennies on the dollar if you know where to look:

Who cares whether someone else bought them first? Kind of like a used car, clothing loses a substantial amount of its initial value as soon as it’s off the lot -- so you can save a lot when you buy used. But whether you use eBay & Etsy, troll thrift stores, or frequent higher-end consignment stores, you can often pick up some top-quality garments for a fraction of the original price.

Secondhand buyers need to be smart though, he says, and steer clear of damaged fabric, ill-fitting bargains, all things polyester, and anything dated or worn out.

I'm not sure how I failed for decades to pick up on the fact that lawyers all around me might be wearing secondhand suits to court, meetings, etc. Honestly, I blame all of you for failing to tell me.

Posted by Bruce Carton on October 1, 2012 at 04:17 PM | Permalink | Comments (5)

Comments

 
 
 
About ALM  |  About Law.com  |  Customer Support  |  Privacy Policy  |  Terms & Conditions