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Tuesday's Three Burning Legal Questions

Here are today's three burning legal questions, along with the answers provided by the blogosphere.

1. Question: I'm about to take the Louisiana bar exam, and let's just say I don't have a good feeling about it. Is there anything I can do to protect myself from the ridicule of my peers if I don't pass?

Answer: Absolutely! Louisiana allows bar applicants to choose fictitious names before taking the exam, to preserve their anonymity in case they end up on the fail list. And if your (fake) name does end up on that list (pdf), take comfort in the fact that you're in the company of such aspiring lawyers as "Rongly Accused," "Clark Kent" and "Atticus Finch." (Above The Law, Recent Bar Exam Results: Open Thread).

2. Question: I'm at the Anchorage airport, catching a flight home to Colorado. I just pointed out that the ticket agent put my baggage sticker on my friend's bag, and the agent said it didn't matter because the bags were going to the same place. I think I'll liven things up by joking that my friend's bag has a bomb in it. Hilarious, right?

Answer: Probably not so funny to the hundreds of travelers who will have to stand outside in below-freezing temperatures while the entire terminal is evacuated. And don't count on leaving Alaska any time soon, as you may get arrested and charged with disorderly conduct. Plus, the airport manager might tell the press that you "did something that in this day and age a teenager would know better than to do." Embarrassing! (The Associated Press, Airline passenger charged with disorderly conduct).

3. Question: I work at a pharmacy. A customer came in to return a certain product, saying his mother no longer needs it. The packaging looks kind of funny, like the bottom of the box might have been glued back together. Should I just put it back on the shelf?

Answer: Wait, does that product happen to be a box of enemas? Definitely check to see if any of the enemas in that box have been used before you try to re-sell them. If they have, the customer could face federal charges of product tampering. And if you re-sell them, you'll get the job of notifying the unsuspecting customers who bought the used goods. (Jonathan Turley, Florida Man Arrested For Returning Used Enemas For Refunds).

Posted by Laurel Newby on October 16, 2012 at 02:26 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)

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