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Recently Admitted Lawyer Seeking Experience? Bring Your Checkbook

Back in my day, after you passed the bar and became a fledgling lawyer, you typically went to work at a law firm. You would get dressed up in a suit, commute to work, pretend like you knew how to perform basic lawyer tasks (until such time as you actually did know how to perform them), and collect a paycheck for your efforts. The last part was key -- you were spending your day working for The Man so you expected to get paid for your time.

I learned via Law and More today, however, that at least one law firm in Stratford, Conn., views that old "law firm pays lawyer" model as obsolete. Indeed, if you want to train under this firm's lawyers, you better bring your checkbook. An ad posted Wednesday on Craigslist (Lawyer-in-training *Get legal experience here* (Stratford/Waterbury)) states:

ARE YOU RECENTLY ADMITTED TO THE BAR, OR AWAITING BAR RESULTS, BUT NEED EXPERIENCE FOR THAT FIRST JOB? 

General practice attorney with more than twenty years of experience is willing to train a small number of recently admitted attorneys, or those awaiting bar results. For a monthly fee, you will be able to shadow the experienced attorney, and learn by watching the day to day practice of law. Observe the following types of proceedings, as they occur; Civil Short Calender motion arguments, foreclosure mediation's, pre-trial conferences, Workers Compensation and Social Security hearings, real estate closings, discovery proceedings and compliance, research and general office operations. ... (Emphasis added).

I still think that there is a 5 percent or so chance that the ad is just poorly worded, and that the "monthly fee" will be paid to the lawyer, but if not we are looking at a whole new "training" revenue stream for lawyers! It is like "Take Your Child to Work Day," but if your child paid you. Actually, it is more like "Take Someone Else's Child to Work Day," and the child's parents pay you since the child/lawyer is unemployed.

Posted by Bruce Carton on January 10, 2013 at 04:20 PM | Permalink | Comments (17)

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