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Oregon Suspends Bias Training for Lawyers

The Oregon Supreme Court Tuesday rejected the State Bar's request to end a requirement that lawyers educate themselves about ways to eliminate recial and ethnic bias, according to a report in the Statesman Journal. But the court ordered a study of the rule and suspended it in the interim. It was a decision, says the Statesman Journal, that gave something to those on both sides of the issue:

Justices voted 5-1 to leave intact a requirement that lawyers educate themselves about how to eliminate racial and ethnic bias.

But the justices also voted 6-0 to ask the Oregon State Bar's board of governors to offer a new proposal to reassess the classes, which amount to one hour each year toward continuing-education credits for lawyers -- and to suspend the requirement during the study.

The Oregon State Bar's board of governors sought the change in the state's CLE requirements after a working group concluded that a majority of its members opposed the elimination-of-bias requirement. Oregon has required anti-bias training for lawyers since 2001, based on an earlier study of racial and ethic bias in the state's courts.

Posted by Robert J. Ambrogi on October 13, 2006 at 03:44 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)

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