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Monday Morning Blawg Wrap

Checking in on this first day of June:

Posts for the calendar impaired. Never mind that we are still a month away from 2009's halfway point, 3 Geeks and Law Blog has compiled a list of the must-read blog posts for the first half of 2009. Guess that means there is really no point in blogging during June.

Consider this, briefly. For all you fans of URL shorteners such as TinyURL, bit.ly and notlong.com, ever wonder what'll happen when these companies realize they have no business model? beSpacific ponders a future populated by zombie links.

The quick comeback. Greta Van Susteren reminds Juan Williams that she was a trial lawyer long before she ever took on the mantle of cable TV host.

Harvard grad makes good. And he does it by getting out of law and into journalism. Bitter Lawyer gets the scoop on Jeffrey Toobin.

Social networking's crawlers. "Social networks for lawyers have a tiny fraction of the members who contribute and the vast bulk who lie very low in the weeds," observes Rees Morrison at Law Department Management.

News as antitrust violation. As top executives from competing newspapers met last week to consider such issues as whether to charge for online content, Editor & Publisher asks whether collective industry action would violate antitrust law.

Imbeciles and the Supreme Court. In 1927, with Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes declaring, "Three generations of imbeciles are enough," the Supreme Court upheld the sterilization of a woman named Carrie Buck. A new book traces the story and lawyer Susan Stefan has a review.

Say what? Social media is becoming like the Tower of Babel, says Mary Abraham at Above and Beyond KM. "The net effect is one of deafening noise. Not only are we all speaking different languages, but we are all speaking at once."

Last but by far not least, if this blawg review left your appetite unsatisfied, check out this week's Blawg Review #214, hosted by Charon QC, who reminds us that on this day in 1812, President James Madison asked Congress to declare war on the United Kingdom. At least presidents asked in those days.

Posted by Robert J. Ambrogi on June 1, 2009 at 11:27 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

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